Protecting your students from online threats during virtual learning

Protecting your students from online threats during virtual learning

We are taking a closer look at what parents can do to make sure their students are protected from online threats during virtual learning. As virtual learning becomes a part of our new normal, parents are becoming more aware of cyber threats.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBMA) — We are taking a closer look at what parents can do to make sure their students are protected from online threats during virtual learning.

As virtual learning becomes a part of our new normal, parents are becoming more aware of cyber threats.

See Also: Educators give a glimpse into what virtual learning for kindergartners looks like

“It was important for me to be very involved in the things they were doing, I have the passwords to all of their accounts, I have parental locks on all of their accounts,” says Jarralynne Agee, parent of 16 and 19 year-old sons.

Agee says what she’s been doing with her two teenage boys so far has been productive, she’s chosen virtual learning for her youngest son this coming semester.

“I have a newfound respect and understanding for how important it is for us to be able to embrace technology and how important it is to stay very engaged in what our students are doing, and help them every step of the way. It wouldn’t hurt if we learned a little bit more, which I’ve had to do, as we help our young people go through virtual learning,” she says.

Experts are helping parents with some tips and tricks too.

Michael Moore CEO of M3 Networks recommends installing content filters on your wifi network.

“Your home wifi devices now, for example Google offers a Google wifi three pack. Those devices come with a step by step application for how to install a content filter, control the time you want them to be online and to shut it off when you don’t want them online anymore,” says Moore.

Actually testing it is important too.

“Don’t just install it and go ‘here kids have fun with this computer’ because if they’re on a computer a large part of the day, they’re going to do something accidentally that was inappropriate, not to mention zoom bombing and all of the child pornography popping up in meetings at this point,” he says.

A few other tips: have waiting rooms and passwords for zoom meetings, and always keep your software updated.

See Also: Home computer overloaded with work and virtual learning? CR has some best buys.

Moore says you should also be careful letting your children use your work computers for their work because many times don’t have the privacy settings that need to be installed for children.

ABC 33 40 News. Ashley Gooden | Wednesday, July 29th 2020

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